Career path: aged residential care (clinical services manager)

August 2015 Vol 15 (4)

Migrating to New Zealand saw JINSU SHINOY fall into a job in residential aged care and never look back.

Jinsu ShinoyName: Jinsu Shinoy

Job title: Clinical Services Manager, Ellerslie Gardens Home and Hospital, Auckland

Nursing qualifications:

  • Bachelor of Science (Nursing) 2008 (SNDT University, Mumbai, India)
  • Preceptorship of Nurses in Practice 2013 (Wintec)
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Leadership and Management in progress (AUT)

Briefly describe your initial five years as an RN

I worked in a variety of settings during my training. After graduating I worked in the intensive care unit as a registered nurse for three years in Lilavati Hospital, Mumbai, before moving to New Zealand in 2011.

Did you have a career plan (vague or definite) on becoming an RN? And how did those first five years influence your subsequent career?

I always wanted to work in a very challenging area, gain experience, improve my knowledge and complete higher studies overseas. My first three years of nursing were very interesting and the knowledge gained was worthwhile. So yes, my initial years as a nurse did influence my career in many ways.

When I moved to New Zealand my initial goal was to understand the New Zealand health setting, gain my New Zealand registration and start working as a nurse.

What led you into your current field or specialty?

To be honest, the current field I am working in is by chance. My first choice was always intensive care. But as I had moved to a new country, and needed experience in the healthcare system, I accepted a job in aged residential care (ARC). As I started working in ARC I found my job very challenging, fulfilling and rewarding so I continued to invest more of my time in training to enhance my career in ARC.

What qualifications, skills or stepping stone jobs do you think were particularly helpful and/or necessary in reaching your current role?

I am very thankful to my previous employer and manager who provided opportunities to enhance my ARC knowledge by sending me to training courses, conferences, workshops etc. I am passionate about gaining knowledge so have also attended a lot of courses in my own time.

 A stepping stone for my career was my previous employer, and the senior management team, trusting me and offering me a position as a clinical manager. I accepted as I always had a passion to be a leader and this gave me a chance to work towards my passion. After accepting the role, I saw the need to support my role with postgraduate education. I am grateful for all the support I received from my previous employer and Waikato DHB, who encouraged and helped me to walk the education road once again.

I personally think education and experience are both equally important to fulfil the needs of my current role. I am really fortunate to come into a new company and receive management backing to complete my postgraduate study.

I would also like to acknowledge my family, my loving husband, and my friends, who supported me in every possible way and provided guidance in time of need. Above all, I thank God Almighty, who opened up the way and showered his blessings on me in this beautiful country, New Zealand.

What personal characteristics do you believe are particularly important for nurses working in your role?

I think as nurses we should have empathy, compassion and a caring attitude towards our residents/patients. Other attitudes and attributes I feel are important are commitment to excellence in the care of the elderly population, a good sense of humour, common sense, honesty, integrity, our own values, a desire to find solutions and a ‘can do’ attitude.

It is vital as a clinical lead to have a conscientious and industrious work ethic. Keeping an open mind to change and learning as practice changes is essential. Communication and listening skills, plus patience, are indispensible attributes to have.

What career advice would you give to nurses seeking a similar role to yours?

  • Make a short-term and long-term goal for your career with some flexibility as this will help to put things into perspective (and help to develop and extend yourself to move out of your comfort zone)
  • Actively take opportunities to keep up to date with best practice
  • Develop the needed skills by experience and education
  • Work in different roles to understand, learn and grow as a nurse
  • Acknowledge the importance of communication and building relationships
  • Dedication, hard work and honesty.

Describe your current role and responsibilities

My role’s main aim is providing a high level of clinical leadership and support to clinical and care staff.

The key objectives of my role are to:

  • provide leadership, supervision and direction to staff with active and applied knowledge and practice (as per the Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act)
  • assist and support the facility manager in effective facility management by having extensive knowledge of relevant legislation and codes of practice (including Health & Disability Commissioner standards and code of rights, ARRC contracts etc.)
  • actively participate in the facility’s quality and risk management programme by seeking continuous improvement of all services
  • monitor the provision of care to residents to ensure the highest standards are achieved and maintained
  • coordinate the provision and the use of clinical supplies within the facility ensuring resources are allocated and utilised cost-effectively
  • provide the oversight of resident clinical records and recordings to ensure they meet organisational and legislative requirements
  • participate in the implementation of an effective education programme
  • be actively involved in all aspects of human resource management
  • demonstrate commitment to the provision of a safe environment for residents and staff
  • assume the responsibilities of the facility manager in their absence
  • undertake additional responsibilities as required (infection control officer, restraint coordinator, health and safety officer etc.)

 

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