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Baby booms to delirium: an experience of overseas dialogue in nursing practice

Two Kiwi nursing academics invited to China to teach an acute care nursing workshop were nonplussed to find themselves also quasi-advisors on managing nursing shortages in the wake of China’s one-child policy coming to an end. 

Q & A: Sally Dobbs

Dr Sally Dobbs is the new chair of NETS (Nursing Education in the Tertiary Sector). Find out about her career spanning a position as deputy matron of an army field hospital in Bosnia and nursing on a hospital ship in the Amazon.

Self-funding: snapshot survey shows room for improvement

PROFESSOR JENNY CARRYER reports on a snapshot survey of how many postgraduate nursing students currently self-fund their studies. 

Cultural safety: becoming a reflexive practitioner

Stereotypes, often perpetuated by media headlines and unconscious prejudices, can all affect how nurses relate to patients. In KATRINA FYERS and SALLIE GREENWOOD’s third and final article they look at how nurses can think in reflexive ways to be more culturally safe practitioners.

How many international nursing students do we train?

International student fees bring in $1 billion a year. Do our 19 nursing schools limit how many international fee-paying student nurses they enrol? Nursing Review reports its survey findings. 

Career path: senior nursing lecturer

The chance to teach nursing students to become culturally competent healthcare professionals inspired DONNA FOXALL to swap working in primary healthcare for a career in nurse education.

Take note: the legal importance of clinical notes

Nurse-turned-lawyer Robin Kay looks at the value of good clinical notes and gives some guidance on how to write them.

Cultural safety: developing self-awareness through reflective practice

How culturally safe is your practice? In the first of a short series of articles on cultural safety, Katrina Fyers and Sallie Greenwood focus on the skills of developing reflective writing to foster self-awareness and support culturally safe practice.

Nurse researchers: creating a force for change

This year’s theme for International Nurses Day is ‘Nurses: A force for change’. Florence Nightingale was just such a force, using statistics and data to challenge practice and develop health policy. We talk to some nurse researchers about the motivation and goals of nurse research, background some researchers’ career paths and share some tips and advice for those who may wish to follow.

Māori and Pacific nurses: is burnout inevitable?

Nursing Review looks at the extra expectations that are often placed on Māori and Pacific nurses and shares some advice for nurses and workplaces on how to avoid the risk of burnout.
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