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Time management: tips for busy nurse leaders

Nursing Review asked some nursing leaders to share some of their best time management tips.

Webscope: ‘workarounds’

Check out these nursing website recommendations from Kathy Holloway. 

Natural diversity: understanding and supporting intersex people

Not all people are ‘typical’ males or females. Nurse educator CRAIG WATERWORTH is keen to raise awareness amongst nurses about intersex people so they can be better supported.

International Nurses Day: make your voices heard

This year’s International Nurses Day (IND) toolkit has a Kiwi flavour. Nursing Review talks to JILL WILKINSON about her contribution to a resource used by more than 20 million nurses worldwide.

Coasters quick to jump on board

The country’s smallest DHB is the quickest to join the #endPJparalysis movement – which aims to get medical patients up and mobile to reduce the risk of deconditioning and loss of independence.

Patients and PJs: an unhealthy relationship

Getting hospital patients out of their pyjamas and into clothes has became a worldwide social media-led movement. FIONA CASSIE finds out about #endPJparalysis and the Christchurch nurse leader behind it.

New pressure injury guide launched

New guiding principles for preventing pressure injuries launched last week are part of a wider project including developing a national approach to reporting pressure injuries.

Nursing portfolios: a simple guide to competency self-assessment

Developing a portfolio and interpreting the Nursing Council of New Zealand competencies remains a confusing landscape for many nurses. This article provides supportive advice and examples of how to effectively self-assess nursing practice against the competencies, especially for nurses randomly selected for a recertification audit. By Liz Manning

Is what’s good for your heart also good for your brain?

Does taking statins reduce the risk of dementia as well as cardiovascular disease? This edition’s Clinically Appraised Topic (CAT) looks at the evidence.

Food for thought: can nutrients nurture better mental health?

When people are suffering from a mental illness, eating healthily often falls by the wayside. But what if nutritional deficiencies are a contributing cause in the first place? Nursing Review talks to psychology professor Julia Rucklidge about the links between nutrition and mental illness.

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