Advertisement

Free chickenpox immunisation underway

From 1 July toddlers will be receiving four vaccines at their 15-month visit with the introduction of the chickenpox vaccine. The Immunisation Advisory Centre* shares advice for nurses on this and other changes.

‘Curiouser and curiouser’: is it time for a fresh look at the NP role?

OPINION: The perpetually curious ANDY McLACHLAN (an Auckland cardiology NP) wonders about sharks in swimming pools and whether it may be time for a fresh look at the nurse practitioner role.

New resources: supervision to portfolios

LIZ MANNING outlines a raft of new resources developed by the College of Nurses.

Webscope: ‘workarounds’

Check out these nursing website recommendations from Kathy Holloway. 

Career path: clinical nurse specialist (APAC)

MARIANNE TE TAU’s career to date is being guided by the philosophy of reflective practice, pursuing professional development and being patient/whānau-centred.

When we are all lost for words: nursing individuals with aphasia

The barriers to expressing and understanding language created by aphasia can be devastating for affected individuals and their family or whānau, and may result in a sense of helplessness for everyone concerned, including nurses. This article describes the nature of aphasia and its impact on communication and outlines strategies available to nurses to help individuals with aphasia to communicate. By Marian Bland and Lesley Batten

Change management: a classic theory revisited

Change management is fundamental to quality and improvement processes. It is also at the heart of leadership. Those implementing change need first to disrupt the status quo, secondly, to move everyone and everything involved to a new way of doing things, and finally, to ensure that the new practice and processes cannot change back to the former state. In this learning activity, we’ll revisit Lewin’s classic theory of planned change in the light of new thinking about resistance and readiness. By Shelley Jones.

Peripheral IV cannulae (PIVC): Saving a line might just save a life.

It is estimated that over half of all hospital patients have an intravenous catheter inserted. Inserting peripheral intravenous cannulae (PIVC) is now a commonplace procedure; however, more can be done to reduce the risk of complications from these invasive devices. This article highlights the importance of meticulous care, maintenance and documentation of PIVC by nurses. By Beverley Hopper

Is what’s good for your heart also good for your brain?

Does taking statins reduce the risk of dementia as well as cardiovascular disease? This edition’s Clinically Appraised Topic (CAT) looks at the evidence.

Prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections

Eight out of 10 healthcare-associated urinary tract infections are attributed to poorly managed indwelling urinary catheters. The longer the catheter remains in situ, the higher the risk for catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI). This article by Monina Gesmundo, Anna King and Lisa Stewart presents strategies that nurses can use to prevent CAUTI and promote patient safety. By Monina Gesmundo, Anna King and Lisa Stewart
Advertisement

Sign Up to the Nursing Review newsletter

You can also subscribe HERE to our student newsletter and print editions

From our latest print edition